Thursday, August 23, 2007

Books/Typhoon holiday Hang over


I am now at the school using the student publication computer. I have finished reading reading the book that a blogging friend has sent. And here's how I feel and think about the book. (I am trying to make use of my school break.)

When I opened the first page of the book and read a few chapters an alarm went off in my head, "Prosperity Gospel!"

I belong to a church that is composed mostly of the poor; a church situated in a poor neighborhood. I grew up in a poor family. Most of our pastors came from poor families who studied in poor schools. I grew up poor and up to now I'm still poor. I grew up thinking that being poor is good. I grew thinking that being poor is a blessing. So, naturally our theology is mostly the theology of the poor. I grew up thinking this way; thinking that God made some people poor so that his grace can be manifested wherein the day-to-day struggle for survival is seen as a virtue, an imitation of Christ. So upon reading the book I can't help but feel threatened or scared of what it is saying.
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The book is a study of money. It is a biblical study on the rights of every Christian to be financially well off. In fact the books says that it is God's will for Christians to be prosperous, to share in the riches of God. The author cited biblical passages with sound interpretations to support his assertions. His challenge is true and practical for how can we expect the church to evangelize if the church has no money!
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One thing about this book is its study of the foundations of Christian prosperity: salvation, service, sanctification and holiness that made this book sound.
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Seek ye first...
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If we are prosperous in spirit why not in material wealth?
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And I say why not?
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A good book that made me rethink our theology of the poor. It made me rethink that being poor is not necessarily a virtue in the same light that being rich is not necessarily sin.
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But I can't help but be scared.

2 comments:

Jayred said...

Hi, George. All is well with you.

You wrote: "So, naturally our theology is mostly the theology of the poor. I grew up thinking this way; thinking that God made some people poor so that his grace can be manifested wherein the day-to-day struggle for survival is seen as a virtue, an imitation of Christ."

Interesting to know this. You know, I used to have this so-called poverty mentality, too, when I was new in my faith. Until a sound, Bible-based preaching on the subject of money and wealth which corrected my old way of thinking. It's not a sin to be rich just as it's not righteous to be poor.

Actually, it would be most ideal if the Lord will bless more Christians financially. That way, we can bless the poor and needy some more, di ba?

Glad the book made you rethink about things. :-)

Have a blessed weekend!

P.S. BTW, would you be so nice to repost this on OO? Thanks!

George said...

HI Jayred,

too busy this week!